Defamation Claims Pierce the "Blogosphere"

By Andrea Anapolsky

Once perceived as just a means for personal expression, blogs have grown into a mainstream form of communication used by business entities, the media, political campaigners and individuals alike. Just last month, Yahoo!® News reported that approximately 40 million blogs have been created, with more than 75,000 blogs added every day. The act of blogging, however, is not exempt from traditional defamation claims, and like any other form of communication,

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Copyright Problems for the Unwary Real Estate Developer

By Scott Hervey

Real estate lawyers take head. Waiting in the tall grass of your client’s real estate development project may be a thorny copyright issue that could cost your client all of the profit it earned on the project, and would probably buy you a serious malpractice claim.

In the course of developing a real estate project, whether it is a residential community or a commercial project, a central component of the project is the architectural plan.

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Court Rejects Adoption of a Public Policy Test Component to Fair Use Doctrine

By Dale Campbell

The United States District Court of Colorado issued summary judgment in favor of several big-name producers and movie studios and against several "clean movie" companies in the business of creating sanitized versions of movies. (Clean Flicks of Colorado LLC, et al. v. Stephen Soderbergh, et al., Case No. 1:02-CV-01662, in the United States District Court of the District of Colorado.)

The litigation was initiated by several clean-movie companies,

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Digital Applications of the Compulsory License

By Scott Hervey

A class action lawsuit filed this past May by a small group of independent music publishers against major online music services for failing to secure licenses to sell downloadable versions of certain songs brought to light what could be a crack in the way labels, digital content distributors and online music services clear music for digital distribution. The publisher’s copyright infringement lawsuit names as defendants Apple, AOL Music Now. Buy.com,

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The RIAA Goes After XM Satellite Radio for Copyright Infringement

By Scott Hervey

XM’s introduction of a new service called XM + MP3 that allows its subscribers to listen to XM’s service on a portable player and record up to fifty hours of programming. In addition, the new service and player (called Inno) allows users to isolate and save perfect digital copies of songs for unlimited replay as long as they maintain their XM subscription. The service also allows XM users to create custom playlists which trigger automatic recording and storage of songs on the playlist when broadcast over one of the many XM stations

The Recording Industry Association of America responded by filing suit against XM for "massive wholesale infringement."

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Learn a Lesson from Puffy - Don't Ignore a Cease and Desist Letter

By Scott Hervey

A Federal district court jury in Nashville levied a $4.3 million dollar verdict against Sean Combs’ (Puffy) Bad Boy Entertainment, Bad Boy, LLC and Universal Records/UMG Recordings for infringing copyright owned by Bridgeport Music and Westbound records. The suit resulted from the use of a six second sample from the Ohio Player’s Singing in the Morning used by producer Easy Money in the title track to the Universal released Notorious B.IG.’s 1994 album “Ready to Die.”

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Your Cell Phone Is A Homing Beacon

Your Cell Phone Is A Homing Beacon -Should The Government Be Allowed To Use It Without Showing Probable Cause?

By: Intellectual Property

Here’s the next step Big Brother is taking toward an Orwellian 1984: Your cellular telephone can pinpoint your location any time it’s turned on. That’s right. Any time your cell phone is turned on and within range of a cellular tower, it is communicating with that tower to broadcast your location.

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Tech Companies, Insure You Choose the Correct E&O Policy!

By Scott Hervey

Picking an Errors and Omission policy can be an extremely important undertaking, especially for a technology focused company. When legal costs for defending a complex intellectual property infringement claim can exceed half a million dollars, the right E&O policy can mean the difference between the life and death of a company just starting to find traction in the market place. But more often than not, the decision on what policy to buy is left to an inexperienced company employee who only has a broker’s advice to rely on.

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The Attorney General's Google Search Comes Up Empty - So Far...Is Your Online Privacy At Stake?

The Attorney General’s Google Search Comes Up Empty – So Far…Is Your Online Privacy At Stake?

By: Intellectual Property

It was just a simple discovery tool, used by the Department of Justice in defense of a lawsuit brought by the American Civil Liberties Union. It hasn’t gotten much attention. In fact, for several months, it got no attention at all. But it’s starting to. So, what is “it?”

On August 25,

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Intend To Infringe = Go To Jail

By Scott Hervey

Intend to infringe – go to jail. That’s what the United States Attorney General proposed at a recent anti-piracy summit hosted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. United States attorney general Alberto Gonzales said the Department of Justice recently submitted to Congress the Intellectual Property Protection Act of 2005 aimed at toughening up intellectual-property enforcement.

Under current law, criminal copyright liability is applicable where a person infringes a copyright willfully,

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