WT Wins: 9th Circuit Decision Broadens the "Ministerial Exception" in Lawsuits Brought Against Religious Employers

After obtaining summary judgment at the district court earlier this year in an employment lawsuit, Paul Gaspari, Daniel Zamora, and Ryan Abernethy prevailed in the 9th Circuit appeal to the dismissal. The 9th Circuit’s judgment sets favorable precedent for religious employers as it broadly applies the ministerial exception under the US Constitution and the Religious Exemption under the Fair Employment and Housing Act.

Read More

WEBINAR: Employment Law Update 2020/2021 - Part I & Part II

Summary of Program

Our Labor & Employment Group presents our annual Employment Law Update where they discuss important legal developments from 2020 and review a number of new employment laws and relevant court cases impacting employers in 202

Program Highlights – Part 1 of 2

This part will focus on:

  • Class Actions
  • Independent Contractors Status
  • Wage and Hour Obligations Specific to Non-Exempt Employees
  • Wage and Hour Obligations Specific to Exempt Employees

This seminar was presented and recorded on January 6,

Read More

Employment Law 2019/2020 - A Year in Review; A Year Ahead (San Francisco)

Summary of Program

Join the attorneys from Weintraub Tobin’s Labor and Employment Group as they discuss legal developments from 2019 and review a number of new laws facing employers in 2020.

Program Highlights

  • New Federal and State Legislation and Court Cases
  • Changes to the Law Governing Classification of Independent Contractors
  • Developments in Harassment, Discrimination and Retaliation Law
  • Leaves of Absence and Reasonable Accommodations
  • Wage and Hour Laws
  • Employment,

Read More

Employment Law 2019/2020 - A Year in Review; A Year Ahead

Due to high demand, we have scheduled this second session to accommodate additional attendees.

Summary of Program

Join the attorneys from Weintraub Tobin’s Labor and Employment Group as they discuss legal developments from 2019 and review a number of new laws facing employers in 2020.

Program Highlights

  • New Federal and State Legislation and Court Cases
  • Changes to the Law Governing Classification of Independent Contractors
  • Developments in Harassment,

Read More

Employment Law 2019/2020 - A Year in Review; A Year Ahead

Summary of Program

Join the attorneys from Weintraub Tobin’s Labor and Employment Group as they discuss legal developments from 2019 and review a number of new laws facing employers in 2020.

Program Highlights

  • New Federal and State Legislation and Court Cases
  • Changes to the Law Governing Classification of Independent Contractors
  • Developments in Harassment, Discrimination and Retaliation Law
  • Leaves of Absence and Reasonable Accommodations
  • Wage and Hour Laws
  • Employment,

Read More

2019 Employment Law Update in San Francisco

Join the attorneys from Weintraub Tobin’s Labor and Employment Group as they discuss important legal developments from 2018 and review a number of new laws facing employers in 2019.

2019 Employment Law Update

Program Highlights:
• New Federal and State Legislation and Court Cases
• Developments in Harassment, Discrimination and Retaliation Law
• Leaves of Absence and Reasonable Accommodations
• Wage and Hour Laws
• Arbitration and Class Actions
• NLRB

Date &

Read More

2019 Employment Law Update - Sacramento

Join the attorneys from Weintraub Tobin’s Labor and Employment Group as they discuss important legal developments from 2018 and review a number of new laws facing employers in 2019.

2019 Employment Law Update

Program Highlights:
• New Federal and State Legislation and Court Cases
• Developments in Harassment, Discrimination and Retaliation Law
• Leaves of Absence and Reasonable Accommodations
• Wage and Hour Laws
• Arbitration and Class Actions
• NLRB

Date &

Read More

Employers May Be Liable For Violence Away From Work

by Daniel C. Zamora
The Labor & Employment Law Blog

Intentional torts committed by employees are difficult for employers to both anticipate and protect against. When an employee commits a criminal act against another employee or a third party, the law generally considers whether the employer knew or should have known that the employee posed a danger in deciding whether a duty to protect against the harm was owed. However, an employee’s dangerous propensity is often difficult to predict.  Employees rarely make overt criminal threats or give unambiguous indications that they intend to cause harm.

Read More