The Briefing: Dr. Seuss Sets Photon Torpedoes on Star Trek Mashup in 9th Circuit Appeal (Part Two, Trademark)

by Scott M. Hervey, Josh H. Escovedo
The IP Law Blog

In this week’s episode of The Briefing by the IP Law BlogScott Hervey and Josh Escovedo discuss the Ninth Circuit Ruling on the trademark aspects of Dr. Seuss “mashups.” They also provide a recap of last week’s episode, which covers the copyright aspects of the case.

Watch episode two on the Weintraub Tobin YouTube channel, here.

Listen to the podcast of this episode on your favorite platform or online here.

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The Briefing - Bonus Olympic Episode: IOC Gets Gold in Trademark Enforcement

by Josh H. Escovedo, Scott M. Hervey
The IP Law Blog

In this bonus episode of the Briefing by the IP Law Blog, Scott Hervey and Josh Escovedo discuss the stringent trademark enforcement protection for Olympic symbols, words, and phrases as well as recent lawsuits that have reinforced that protection.

Lawsuits discussed:
San Francisco Arts & Athletics, Inc. v United States Olympic Committee
USOPC v Puma

Watch the video of this episode on YouTube,

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The Briefing - Nike Threatens Fire & Brimstone Over Satanic Custom Shoe Makers

by Josh H. Escovedo, Scott M. Hervey
The IP Law Blog

In this week’s episode of The Briefing by The IP Law Blog, attorneys Scott Hervey and Josh Escovedo discuss the trademark litigation between Nike and a custom shoe maker, MSCHF (pronounced “Mischief”). In Nike Inc. v MSCHF Product Studio, Inc., Nike sued MSCHF over unauthorized versions of the Nike Air Max 97 featuring satanic imagery. The shoes were tied into marketing by Rapper Lil Nas X, and all 666 pairs created by MSCHF were sold.

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The Briefing - What's in a Name: Clearing Titles for Film and Television

by Scott M. Hervey, Josh H. Escovedo
The IP Law Blog

In this week’s episode, Scott Hervey and Josh Escovedo discuss the complex process of clearing titles for Film and Television. They cover recent high-stakes litigation around entertainment titles, including Stouffer v. National Geographic Partners LLC,  Jon Astor-White v. Daniel Strong (Empire), and the “Honey Badger” case.

View the video conversation on YouTube.

An audio version of this episode can be found on “The Briefing from the IP Law Blog”

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Supreme Court Finds PTAB Judges Unconstitutional

by Eric Caligiuri
The IP Law Blog

5-4 Opinion Offers Judicial Workaround by Giving More Oversight to the USPTO Director

In U.S. v. Arthrex, case number 19-1434; Smith & Nephew v. Arthrex, case number 19-1452; and Arthrex v. Smith & Nephew, case number 19-1458, the Supreme Court of the United States recently held that Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) judges are unconstitutionally appointed.  But, the Court also held that providing the Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) with more oversight over PTAB rulings will remedy the unconstitutionality of the PTAB judges.

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Will Starbucks Become the Next Corporate Sponsor of a Professional Sports Facility?

by Josh H. Escovedo
The IP Law Blog

I’m experiencing déjà vu. I wrote about a similar topic prior to Allegiant Air becoming the official sponsor of the Las Vegas stadium that the Raiders now call home. In fact, I covered the topic at a time when Allegiant Air claimed that it was not involved in any negotiations for the naming rights of any professional sports facilities despite having filed an application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office for use of Allegiant in connection with stadium or training facilities.

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Beer: You Know It When You Taste It, Or Maybe Not

by Jo Dale Carothers, Ph.D.
The IP Law Blog

Hard seltzer first hit the marketplace about five years ago and rapidly grew in popularity with sales exceeding $4.5 billion in 2020.  Wanting to ride the wave of success, many companies have introduced hard seltzers into this now crowded space.  But what is a hard seltzer?  Is it a form of beer or something else?  Based on its popularity, most would say, “Who cares whether hard seltzer is beer, just give me one.”  However, Modelo Grupo (“Modelo”) and Constellation Brands (“Constellation”) would say there is a lot riding on the answer.

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Kobe Bryant Estate Files for Numerous Trademarks Associated with Apparel and Footwear

by Josh H. Escovedo
The IP Law Blog

If you pay much attention to sneakers, you might know that the agreement between Nike and the Bryant Estate for Nike’s line of Kobe sneakers recently expired. Although Kobe started his career with Adidas, he changed to Nike in 2003, and he stayed there for the rest of his life. Many people expected the estate to reach a deal with Nike to continue the partnership, but the deal has officially expired without any sort of agreement being reached.

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De Novo or Abuse of Discretion? Trademarks, The Unclean Hands Defense, and Summary Judgment Review

by James Kachmar
The IP Law Blog

The Ninth Circuit recently considered an issue of first impression: What standard of review does an appellate court apply when reviewing a district court’s grant of summary judgment in a trademark infringement case on the equitable basis of the unclean hands doctrine. The Ninth Circuit faced this issue in the case titled: Metal Jeans, Inc. v. Metal Sport, Inc. (decided Feb. 16, 2021).

In the Metal Jeans case,

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Josh Escovedo in the Sacramento Business Journal: Court Sides With Friends With Benedicts In Restaurant Trademark Dispute

Sonya Sorich writes in the Sacramento Business Journal that a ruling by the El Dorado County Superior Court has settled a long-running trademark dispute between Sacramento-area restaurants in favor of Weintraub client Friends with Benedicts Mimosa House LLC.  Early Morning, Inc., which operates the Mimosa House chain, had sued Friends with Benedicts for trademark infringement in 2018, but the Court said that the “plaintiff did not provide admissible evidence or legal authority that its subject mark,

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